rivers of india

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Rivers of India

The river systems provide irrigation, potable water, cheap transportation, electricity.
41. Gandaki River
Gandak redirects here. For the village in Kohgiluyeh and BoyerAhmad Province, Iran, see Gandak, Kohgiluyeh and BoyerAhmad. For the village in Tehran Province, Iran, see Gandak, Tehran.The Kali Gandaki or Gandaki River (also known as the Narayani in southern Nepal and the Gandak in India) is one of the major rivers of Nepal and a left bank tributary of the Ganges in India. It is also called Krishna Gandaki in Nepal.[1] In Nepal the river is notable for its deep gorge through the Himalayas and its enormous hydroelectric potential. It has a total catchment area of 46,300 square kilometers (17,900 sq mi), most of it in Nepal. The basin also contains three of the worlds 14 mountains over 8,000m, Dhaulagiri, Manaslu and Annapurna I. Dhaulagiri is the highest point of the Gandaki basin. It lies between the similar Kosi system to the east and the Karnali (Ghaghara) system to the west.
42. Son River
Son River of central India is the largest of the Ganges southern tributaries.The Son originates near Amarkantak in Madhya Pradesh, just east of the headwater of the Narmada River, and flows northnorthwest through Madhya Pradesh state before turning sharply eastward where it encounters the southwestnortheastrunning Kaimur Range. The Son parallels the Kaimur hills, flowing eastnortheast through Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand and Bihar states to join the Ganges just above Patna. Geologically, the lower valley of the Son is an extension of the Narmada Valley, and the Kaimur Range an extension of the Vindhya Range. Dehri on sone is the major town situated on Son River.
43. Banas River
The Banas is a river of Rajasthan state in western India. It is a tributary of the Chambal River, which in turn flows into the Yamuna, a tributary of the Ganges. The Banas is approximately 512 kilometres in length. It is also known as Van Ki Asha (Hope of forest).[citation needed] The Banas originates in the Khamnor Hills of the Aravalli Range, about 5 km from Kumbhalgarh in Rajsamand district. It flows northeast through the Mewar region of Rajasthan, and meets the Chambal near the village of Rameshwar in Sawai Madhopur District. The cities of Nathdwara, Jahajpur, and Tonk lie on the river. Major tributaries include the right bank tributaries of Berach and Menali and the left bank tributaries of Kothari, Khari, Dai, Dheel River, Sohadara, Morel and Kalisil. The Banas drains a basin of 45,833 km?, and lies entirely within Rajasthan. It is a seasonal river that dries up during the summer, but it is nonetheless used for irrigation. The BisalpurJaipur project completed by the Government of Rajasthan in 2009 provides drinking water from the Banas to Jaipur city. Banas drains the east slope of the central portion of the Aravalli Range, and the basin includes all or part of Ajmer, Bhilwara, Bundi, Chittorgarh, Dausa, Jaipur, Pali, Rajsamand, Sawai Madhopur, Tonk, and Udaipur districts. The Thala ki Mata temple near Deoli in Tonk district is located on its bank.
44. Ghaghara
Karnali or Ghaghara is a perennial transboundary river originating on the Tibetan Plateau near Lake Mansarovar. It cuts through the Himalayas in Nepal and joins the Sarda River at Brahmaghat in India. Together they form the Ghaghra River, a major left bank tributary of the Ganges. With a length of 507 kilometres (315 mi) it is the largest river in Nepal. The total length of Ghaghara River up to its confluence with the Ganges at Doriganj in Bihar is 1,080 kilometres (670 mi). It is the largest tributary of the Ganges by volume and the second longest tributary of the Ganges by length after Yamuna.
45. Rohni River
The Rohni or Rohini River rises in the Chure or Siwalik Hills in Kapilvastu and Rupandehi Districts of Nepals Lumbini Zone and flows south into Uttar Pradesh state, India. At Gorakhpur it becomes a left bank tributary of West Rapti River, which in turn joins the Gh?ghara above Gaura Barhaj, then Ghaghara in turn joins the Ganges. According to an account in several Buddhist texts, Kapilavatthu the town of the Sakyans and Koliya the town of the Kolyans were situated on either side of the Rohini river. The cultivators of both towns worked the fields watered by the Rohini river. One year, they did not have enough rain and finding that the paddy and other crops were beginning to shrivel up, cultivators on both sides wanted to divert the water from the Rohini river to their own fields. Those living in Koliya said that there was not enough water in the river for both sides, and that if only they could channel the water just once more to their fields that would be enough for the paddy to mature and ripen. On the other hand, people from Kapilavatthu argued that, in that case, they would be denied the use of the water and their crops would surely fail, and they would be compelled to buy from other people. They said that they were not prepared to go carrying their money and valuables to the opposite bank of the river in exchange for food. Both sides wanted the water for their own use only and there was much ill will between them due to abusive language and accusations on both sides. The quarrel that started between the cultivators came to the ears of the ministers concerned, and they reported the matter to their respective rulers, and both sides prepared to go to war
46. Sharda River
The Sharda River or Mahakali River is also called Kali Gad by local Pahari people in Uttarakhand where the river demarcates Nepals western border with India. This boundary was established by the 1816 Sugauli treaty. The river is also spelled as Sarda. The river descends from 3,600 metres at Kalapani to 200 metres entering the Terai plains, offering an unrealized potential for hydroelectric power generation. The river is also proposed as source for one of the many projects in the Himalayan component of the Indian Rivers Interlink project. Below the NepalUttarakhand border the river enters Uttar Pradesh state and flows southeast across the plains to join the Ghagra river, a tributary of the Ganges.
47. Sarayu
The Sarayu is a river that flows through the Indian states of Uttarakhand and Uttar Pradesh. This river is of ancient significance, finding mentions in the Vedas and the Ramayana. The Sarayu forms at the confluence of the Karnali (or Ghaghara) and Mahakali (or Sharda) in Bahraich District. The Mahakali or Sharda forms the IndianNepalese border. Ayodhya is situated on the banks of river Sarayu. Some mapmakers consider the Sarayu to be just a section of the lower Ghaghara River.
48. Gori Ganga
Gori Ganga is a river in the Munsiyari tehsil of the Pithoragarh District, part of the state of Uttarakhand in northern India. Its source is the Milam Glacier, just northeast of Nanda Devi. The village Milam is located one kilometer below the snout of the glacier. Here a leftbank stream called Gonka joins the Gori. The valley provides the approach route for access to peaks such as Nanda Devi East, Hardeol, Trishuli, Panchchuli, and Nanda Kot. The Gori is also fed by glaciers and streams flowing from the eastern slopes of the east wall of the Nanda Devi Sanctuary, and those flowing west from the high peaks of Panchchuli, Rajramba, and Chaudhara, including the Ralam Gad and the Pyunsani Gadhera. The KalabalandBurfu Kalganga glacier system also flows into the Gori Ganga Valley from the east
49. Gomti River
he Gomti, Gumti or Gomati River is a tributary of the Ganges River. According to Hindu mythology the river is the daughter of Sage Vashist, and bathing in the waters of the Gomati on Ekadashi (the eleventh day of the Sanatana DharmaHindu calendar) can wash away ones sins. According to the major religious work, Srimad Bhagavatam, the Gomati is one of the many transcendental rivers in India.
50. Yamuna
The Yamuna sometimes called Jamuna is the largest tributary river of the Ganges (Ganga) in northern India. Originating from the Yamunotri Glacier at a height of 6,387 metres on the south western slopes of Banderpooch peaks in the uppermost region of the Lower Himalayas in Uttarakhand, it travels a total length of 1,376 kilometers (855 mi) and has a drainage system of 366,223 square kilometres (141,399 sq mi), 40.2% of the entire Ganges Basin, before merging with the Ganges at Triveni Sangam, Allahabad, the site for the Kumbha Mela every twelve years. It crosses several states, Uttarakhand, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh, passing by Himachal Pradesh and later Delhi, and meets its tributaries on the way, including Tons, its largest and longest tributary in Uttarakhand, Chambal, which has its own large basin, followed by Sindh, the Betwa, and Ken. Most importantly it creates the highly fertile alluvial, YamunaGanges Doab region between itself and the Ganges in the IndoGangetic plain. Nearly 57 million people depend on the Yamuna waters. With an annual flow of about 10,000 cubic billion metres (cbm) and usage of 4,400 cbm (of which irrigation constitutes 96 per cent), the river accounts for more than 70 per cent of Delhi


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